Archive for the ‘Wolfdogs / Varghundar’ Category

Wolf rescued by Houston SPCA flown to new home   Leave a comment

October 21, 2016

 Wolf rescued by Houston SPCA flown to new home
Wednesday, October 19, 2016

A gray wolf that was seized two months ago in Harris County is now on its way to a wolf sanctuary in Washington state. The flight carrying him to a cooler climate and a recognized rescue that specializes in wolves left this morning.

He was part of a seizure of more than a dozen animals from a feed store in the Aldine area. It wasn’t aggressive, it would just stand at a distance,” said Sgt Christine Hendrick, who also said it wasn’t being fed an appropriate diet for a wolf, and its enclosure was inadequate.

One of the store’s owners said a man gave them the animal several years ago, because he was moving. “He told us it was a wolf hybrid.” The SPCA’s DNA test showed that it was almost pure grey wolf.

By law, wolves, and wolf hybrids are not allowed to be kept in Harris County. Until recently, gray wolves were on the federal endangered species list.

VIDEO:

http://abc13.com/video/embed/?pid=1563576#videoplayer

Since the seizure, the wolf was kept in the exotic animal area of the Houston SPCA. He has put on some weight, but human contact is kept to a minimum. “We didn’t want him to imprint on any more people,” said Brian Latham of the Houston SPCA. “We want him to be a wolf.”

Because of that, he was put in a covered kennel in preparation for the long flight to Washington state, so he wouldn’t react to the activity around him.

Wolf Haven International is regarded as one of the top sanctuaries to care for rescued wolves. Its newest resident, who was neutered several years ago, will be paired with a female wolf. It will likely be the first time he will be with one of his kind.

The wolf was not given a name by the SPCA. “We don’t name wildlife, because that’s what they are — wildlife,” said Latham.


Source

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How wolves and warriors help each other heal   5 comments

January 5, 2016 – Source

Matthew Simmons, Lorin Lindner and wolfdog Wiley at LARC

Matthew Simmons and Dr. Lorin Lindner at Lockwood Animal Rescue Center with Wiley, a wolfdog they saved from being euthanized. (Photo: Jennifer Dallas)

About 90 minutes north of Los Angeles at the Lockwood Animal Rescue Center (LARC), healing magic happens every day. Nestled on acres of scenic land inside theLos Padres National Forest, LARC’s Warriors and Wolves program offers combat veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder the chance to bond withwolves and wolfdogs that have been rescued from abusive situations or abandoned because their wild roots make them poor pets. Together they heal and gain a sense of belonging — and a second chance at life.

“Combat veterans have been paid to be predators, much like wolves,” says LARC co-founder and Navy veteran Matthew Simmons. “Many come home with this inner war inside them. They don’t know if they’re an infantryman or a husband. And my wolves don’t know if they’re a wolf or a dog. That inner turmoil they’re both suffering bonds them together and they form a partnership that helps them both.”

LARC veteran bonds with wolfdog

A LARC veteran bonds with wolfdog Cochise who was relinquished by his owner for being a problem pet. (Photo: Sarah Varley)

Life after trauma

Simmons is intimately familiar with the horrors of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). After serving in the Navy, including a stint in Desert Storm, he returned home and launched a computer company. He felt focused and successful, but the harrowing memories of combat lay buried, waiting to surface. He began waking at night soaked in sweat and felt strangely agitated after business meetings.

As his sleeplessness and emotional turbulence grew, Simmons consulted a psychiatrist who prescribed sleeping pills. He was soon popping a few at a time and washing them down with wine. “By this point I’d sold my computer company and was in turmoil, drinking too much and taking too many pills,” he says.

Desperate to stop his downward slide, Simmons visited another psychiatrist who diagnosed him with PTSD and suggested getting immediate help through the Veterans Administration (VA). PTSD can develop after traumatic events, including combat, and may cause nightmares, flashbacks, detachment, angry outbursts, addiction and sometimes suicide.

“I didn’t know what PTSD was, nor did I necessarily think I had it,” Simmons says. “I was a big tough guy.”

But he heeded the advice and connected with the VA Medical Center in West Los Angeles where he soon found himself volunteering to care for abandoned parrots and other exotic birds living on-site in the Serenity Park Sanctuary. Run by licensed clinical psychologist Lorin Lindner, the eco-therapy program helps traumatized veterans and traumatized birds recover together.

The experience changed his life. “That’s where I met the three animals I believe have kept me safe, sane and sober,” Simmons says.

The first two were Maggie and Ruby, feral parrots from San Francisco that had barely survived a brutal raccoon attack. “I watched them physically heal, and whether I was cognizant of it or not, I watched them forgive and let go,” Simmons says. Gaining their trust and nursing them back to health helped him release his own emotional wounds.

His third guardian “animal” was Dr. Lindner, now his wife.

LARC founds with rescue horse and wolfdog

Lindner and Simmons pictured at Lockwood Animal Rescue Center with a rescue horse Megan and Huey, a good-natured wolfdog found abandoned on the streets of Houston. (Photo: Jennifer Dallas)

Eco-therapy for the soul

In 2007, the couple bought a remote property outside Los Angeles in Frazier Park, known for its panoramic mountain views and pristine beauty. They started LARC, a privately funded non-profit, and began rescuing abused horses. At the same time, they learned about captive wolves and high-content wolfdogs (wolves with dog heritage) also in need of forever homes. Many are bred as exotic pets, only to be relinquished to shelters or permanently chained outside for exhibiting natural “wild” and “aggressive” wolf behaviors rooted in their DNA. Wolfdogs aren’t eligible for adoption at shelters so are usually euthanized.

After saving a wolfdog named Wiley minutes before he was to be destroyed, Simmons started taking him on visits to the VA. He was amazed at Wiley’s positive impact on everyone there. “The doctors acted different, the guys in my support group acted different, the security guard acted different, and so did I,” he says. “Absolutely everything changed.”

The couple decided to launch the Warriors and Wolves program at LARC, patterned after Lindner’s successful parrot program, to help veterans with PTSD who needed additional help. “These guys usually have a drug and alcohol problem,” Simmons says. “They’re disenfranchised from their families, often homeless, and many are suicidal.”

The couple also continued rescuing wolfdogs, including 29 that had spent their lives chained in a small enclosure at a roadside wolf attraction near Anchorage, Alaska. Former game show host and long-time animal activist Bob Barker donated $100,000 to fund the rescue.

The cornerstone of Warriors and Wolves is the idea that nature can heal a broken spirit. Veterans — who are either employed by LARC or volunteer — go on nature hikes and participate in stream-bed restoration, but the heart of their work is caring for the wolves and wolfdogs, who, like them, are outsiders and often misunderstood.

LARC volunteers cut up raw meat

Veteran volunteers cut up raw meat for LARC’s wolves and wolfdogs. Meat is obtained from the Landfill Diversion Program — mostly overstock and sell-by-date cuts that would otherwise be tossed by grocery stores. (Photo: Matthew Simmons)

Most quickly bond with one specific wolf or wolfdog. “The animal selects the veteran, and it’s a unique selection to that veteran,” Simmons says. “They usually have similar trauma and similar physical ailments. There’s no way they could know that. Some sort of cross-species communication goes on between them.”

Most remarkable is the special solace and healing they find together — a bond that lasts for life. And it’s not just with their soulmate animal; veterans are also accepted into the wolf pack where they learn about family and trust.

Many of the veterans go on to good jobs, often working with animals. Those who need more time can transition to the New England Wolf Advocacy and Rescue Center (NEWARC) in New Hampshire, which Simmons and Lindner started in 2013. Veterans live and work there for six months to a year, earning a good salary and continuing to heal. Many are able to reconnect with wives and children they pushed away during their PTSD battles and repair damaged relationships.

“Our program heals veterans who would otherwise probably die,” says Simmons. “And the wolves get to live out their lives and maybe share it in a special way with another sentient being who’s also suffered. It’s magical and special.”

Rescued wolfdog at LARC

Like many wolfdogs, Willow Girl was turned over to a shelter by her owners and slated to be euthanized. She now lives freely in a 3-acre natural habitat enclosure at LARC. (Photo: Renae Smith)

By Sidney Stevens

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Did Dogs Help Humans Outcompete Neanderthals?   Leave a comment

September 1, 2015

Source

Humans entered a Europe after Neanderthals were already well established. Why did Neanderthals vanish. Given human nature, it’s hard for me to believe there wasn’t a fair amount of conflict between the two groups, but you needn’t assume humans wiped Neanderthals out.   National Geographic offers an alternative explanation consistent with known facts,

Unlike Neanderthals, humans had spears and bows and arrows, weapons that could kill from a distance. And also unlike Neanderthals, humans had dogs, or at least something between wolves and what we think of today as dogs. These wolf-dogs, as the article refers to them, helped humans hunt successfully. As the Ice Age intensified, an edge in hunting gave humans an edge in survival.

Neanderthals seem to have specialized in stabbing an animal at close quarters with handheld weapons and wrestling it down. We had weapons we could launch from a distance, which is a very big advantage. There’s a lot less risk of personal injury.

Add into that mix the doggy traits of being able to run for hours much faster than we can, track an animal by its scent, then with a group of other wolf dogs surround the animal and hold it in place while you tire it out. The advantage for wolf dogs is that humans can come in and kill from a distance. The wolf dogs don’t have to go and kill this thing with their teeth, thereby lowering the risk of injury and death from very large animals like mammoths. For humans, it meant you could find the animals a lot quicker and kill them more efficiently. More food, less risk, faster.

Find the complete article on National Geographic:

Did Dog-Human Alliance Drive Out the Neanderthals?

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Last call to be part of saving the sanctuary!   2 comments

2015-08-16

Together we’ve been watching the challenges faced by local wolf and wolfdog sanctuary, In Harmony With Nature, as they faced the potential for losing their property over the past year following an illness of a benefactor and other difficulties.  You helped us share the story, raise funds, and work to make a paw-sitive difference for these amazing animals and local educational resource.  THANK YOU for your support!!

Gavin, Volunteer with the Artist Heroes project

This refuge has been in a veritable Schrodinger’s Box for quite a while – and we will soon get to peek inside.  Your continued support over the next couple of weeks could mean the difference between a bright future for these animals – or an uncertain and potentially devastating one.

The property was lost at action to the bank – they outbid the individual who entered the auction to save the property.  Now, the property is with a company that will be selling it – and the sanctuary has the option to work with them.  There are many potential positive outcomes, but in a likely scenario In Harmony will need to have the cash to purchase the property.

If you haven’t pledged yet, or would consider making an additional pledge, please log in today.  Your contribution could make all the difference.

handpaw2

How does this benefit you and our greater community?  Come join our Picnic With Wolves on December 5th for a tour, or simply think about the potential for local youth to have a wolf and wolfdog tour or service project to learn about a unique aspect of responsible pet ownership and breeding; a group tour or service event for your social group, work group, or team; and most importantly the service to these animals that is unique, specialized, and in great demand.   There are scores of wolfdogs on waiting lists for rescues – and only a few specialized agencies able to care for them.  Let’s not lose this one, that is located in our local community and has the potential not only to impact the animals, but to provide a wonderful engagement opportunity for us all.

You can learn more about the refuge at IHWN.org.

Other Links:

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http://ihwn.org/

SOURCE

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Picnic With Wolves II (A Picnic With a Purpose)   Leave a comment

From BE Orlando on July 2, 2015

picnicwithwolves

Save the date for a picnic lunch on Saturday, December 5th. Why?  Because you need a wolf kiss.

Family-friendly pot luck social picnic for volunteers, supporters, and friends of the private facility wolf & wolfdog sanctuary.  A guided tour will be provided.

Event hosted by BE. Orlando; members, friends, and families of all groups in our Central Florida Coalition of Reason, Florida Humanist Association, and other secular communities network are welcome (with RSVP on this site).

This event is free to attend, family friendly, and smoke free.

A Picnic With a Purpose! 100% of proceeds through voluntary donations will support IHWN.

RSVP with BE:

Picnic With Wolves

Saturday, Dec 5, 2015, 11:30 AM

7 Awesome People Attending

Check out this Meetup —- >>


LINKS

Cochrane – Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctuary & Glenbow Ranch Provincial Park   2 comments

Glenbow Ranch Provincial Park

Glenbow Ranch Provincial Park is one of Alberta’s newest provincial parks. Located along the north shore of the Bow River between Calgary and Cochrane, it consists of more than 1,300 hectares of foothills parkland. The park is managed through a formal partnership with the Glenbow Ranch Park Foundation. It:

  • preserves and protects significant natural features, including endangered ecosystems and rare species; and
  • provides a unique opportunity to showcase the rich history of ranching and historic Glenbow townsite.

To protect natural landscapes and historical features, some areas of the park are closed to the public. Closed areas are clearly marked by signs and/or fences. Visitors are asked to obey all posted signs and notices.

The Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctuary Mission

Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctuary is a non-profit organization located east of the Rocky Mountains near Cochrane, Alberta. We are situated on 160 acres of land with a current pack of 5 resident wolfdogs plus various adoptable wolfdogs.

We are dedicated to providing educational programs regarding wolves and wolfdogs in order to foster a greater understanding of the importance of preserving wild wolves in the natural environment, as well as promoting responsible wolfdog ownership. We are also dedicated to providing rescue and safe sanctuary to wolfdogs that have been neglected, abandoned, or otherwise displaced.

The Pack

At Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctuary we believe that all animals should be part of “the family” and as a result, all our wolfdogs and rescues are treated as such. They are welcome to come inside the house, sleep on the furniture, and enjoy all the luxuries of being a family pet. We strongly believe that no domestic animal, whether part wolf or not, should have to live out their lives in an enclosure. We encourage all our wolfdogs and rescue animals to be active members of the family, and thus enjoy the benefits that come with being part of a human pack. We strive to give all members of our pack as much freedom as possible and as a result, our animals enjoy off-leash hikes every day.

NOVA

Nova was born April 21, 2012 at a breeding facility in the Unites States. He came to YWS to be the organization’s ambassador wolfdog to help us further our educational programs. Nova’s primary role will be to help us educate the public about wolves and wolfdogs so that these wonderful animals will no longer be misunderstood. Nova is a very sweet boy with a lot of personality. Some of his favourite things to do is chew on his toy sheep and get some belly rubs from both the human and canine pack members. We look forward to watching Nova grow into the amazing wolfdog we know he will be.

KUNA

Kuna was born May 15, 2009 at a private wolf facility in Saskatchewan. She came to be part of the family as an 11-week-old puppy when her previous owners felt she was too difficult to handle. Kuna is a very smart, independent, but very stubborn wolfdog. She has an amazing ability to communicate to us exactly what she wants, whether it is another raw meat patty or some extra love and attention. When she isn’t outside playing with the other dogs or getting herself into trouble, she loves to come inside and cuddle with a human pack member on the couch.

ZEUS

Zeus was born April 23, 2010 and is a half sibling to Kuna. He came to Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctuary in June 2011 at a year old after his owner was no longer able to provide the proper care and containment for him to be happy and safe. Zeus is a very sweet and loving boy and is learning to be more comfortable in the house every week. He loves nothing more than going for walks to the Bow River so that he can have his daily swim or sleeping in the sunshine with Kuna.

SKOOKUM

Skookum is our resident malamute who helps us teach visitors the differences between a wolfdog and a regular dog like a malamute. He was born May 3, 2010 and has been a part of our pack since he was just 7 weeks old. He is always a fan favourite as he always gives everyone a very warm welcome. Skookum is always a happy, goofy guy and along with Kuna, completes the alpha pair.

PIKA

Pika came to YWS in February of 2010 as a rescue. She was found at the Morley dump with a very badly deformed leg, and was obviously suffering from malnutrition. She started out as a foster but because we completely fell in love with her and  had formed quite the friendship with Kuna, we decided to keep this little girl. This girl holds her own around the big dogs, and there have been several times we’ve seen her run down Kuna or Zeus, grab them by the neck, and wrestle them down to the ground and pin them. Pika plays an integral role in our sanctuary as she helps to socialize the rescued wolfdogs to small dogs like her. She is a trooper with an amazing spirit!

RASPBERRY

Raspberry is another rescue that came to YWS from the Morley dump in February 2010. We found Raspberry roaming around the dump with her sister looking for food. It was clear to us that this girl was completely feral after having caught her in a dog trap and bringing her home. For 3 months we worked with her in an outside enclosure hoping she’d let us touch her. Once we were able to slip a collar on her and take her for pack walks with us, she came around very quickly. Because Raspberry went through such a major rehabilitation and we had her for such a long time, we could not bear to part ways with her. Today, she is still a permanent member of the pack and has come such a long way. She inspires us to continually work with animals that are terrified of human contact, because with time and lots of patience, we know these animals can come around.

HOPE

Hope has been a part of our family for over 10 years now! She was Georgina’s very first rescued dog! Hope was found wandering around as a puppy in July 2001. She has been through so much with us and had one of the most difficult jobs a dog could ever have: raising Kuna! It seems no matter what we throw at her, she takes it all in stride. She is stuck to us like glue, and is probably one of the most loyal and appreciative dogs we’ve ever had. She is definitely starting to slow down, but we are hoping she will stick around for as long as she possibly can.


From Numinous Experience on July 22, 2015 by J Skaarup

Yukon – Low-content wolfdog

Arrow – German Shepherd

Nova – male, high-content wolfdog

Nova

Nova

Nova and Zeus – male, high-content wolfdogs

Zeus – Alpha male, high-content wolfdog

Zeus

Rue – 4 month high-content wolfdog puppy

Rue

Rue

Rue

Rue wouldn’t drop her eye to eye gaze when taking a treat

Rue

Rue

Kaida – female high-content wolfdog

Kaida

Kaida

Kaida

Kaida

Nova and Kaida playing at the tree line

3/5 of the pack

Kuna – female high-content wolfdog

Kuna

Kuna

Kuna

Kuna

Kuna

Shadow – Male low-content wolfdog. One of 201 dogs rescued from Milk River.

Shadow

Shadow

Shadow

Loki – Male low-content wolfdog

Loki

Loki

Loki

Loki

Loki

WHEN THE WOLF GAVE UP THE SOFA   Leave a comment

From: The Clare Champion

There are lots of theories on how wolves decided to interact with humans. Did we “adopt” the cutest of the abandoned wolf cubs? Highly unlikely, as we know, with scientific research, living with a sociable wolf as a family pet is next to impossible. Domestic dogs evolved from a group of wolves that came into contact with European hunter-gatherers between 18 800 and 32 100 years ago; this wolf has since died out. Can you imagine 32 100 years ago trying to hunt to feed your family, let alone a large wolf, who could kill you over a meal. The hunting hypothesis, that humans used wolves to hunt, doesn’t hold up. Humans were already successful hunters without wolves, more successful than every other large carnivore. People have a long history of eradicating wolves, rather than trying to adopt them. Over the last few centuries, almost every culture has hunted wolves to extinction.

The most likely explanation is that they probably domesticated themselves. Humans living in groups and villages would have waste dumps and some clever wolf figured there was an easy meal to be had by scavenging in these dumps. So the wolves who weren’t afraid to run when they saw people or didn’t attack because that would get him killed, hung around and saw humans as an easy meal ticket. A few hundred years later, these wolves would be living in the village and if they were cute enough and didn’t run, the people would perhaps encourage them to hang around as an early warning system when they would bark in response to danger. Not only did the behaviour of this “protodog” change but so did its body shape and looks. Long floppy ears, puppy like small heads, smaller body, brain and skull developed, as did the ability to read human gestures and language. The domestic dog or canis familiaris lost its fear of humans and started to follow on hunting expeditions, helping track down prey and received food in return.

So they became very useful to have around as, guard dogs, as help during the hunt, perhaps as a companion and play mate for early human children and, a bit unpleasant to think about, but a ready meal when times were tough.

It looks more and more likely that his now extinct wolf adopted us; dogs may even have been the catalyst for our civilization.

If you would like to know more about how dogs came to be on the sofa, Professor Raymond Coppinger will be holding a full day seminar in Dublin on June 28 on this subject and what makes our dogs tick. Professor Coppinger is one of the world’s most renowned experts on dogs, having written and published along with his team, over 70 books and science papers on all things dog.

The seminar is open to everyone who has a dog, or wants to know more not just professional trainers, groomers, vets and vet nurses,

For more details on this special event, see http://www.apdt.ie/events or you can give me a call. This will be Professor Coppinger’s first time in Ireland and hhis last visit to Europe. If you want to know more about dogs then this is the Dog Day Out for you.

Written by: Bev Truss, a qualified vet nurse (RVN DipCAPBT APDT1010 CFR1033) and can be reached at EduPet in Shannon bev@adupet.org or 086 862 4511.

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