Archive for the ‘Petitions’ Category

BE A VOICE FOR ALASKA’S ARCHIPELAGO WOLVES   Leave a comment

From intheshadowofthewolf on July 23, 2015

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Please send off these tweets to your following at your leisure over the weekend for added support. This imperiled species needs our help urgently with as many voices as we can muster! Thank you.

**Tweetstorm**  #Wolves  #StandForWolves  Please be a voice for Archipelago Wolves: https://t.co/eEorYSwIug PLS RT

Tweet this: 💙http://ctt.ec/U22

Alaska’s #Wolves face catastrophe, Alexander Archipelago Wolves population plummeted 60% in 1 yr. Be their voice:  goo.gl/R5FfLq

Tweet this: 💙http://ctt.ec/zce29

**Tweetstorm**  #Wolves #SaveWolves #StandForWolves Be a voice for the imperiled Archipelago Wolves:  http://t.co/oPeXzNcwgc

Tweet this: 💙http://ctt.ec/cbroy

Demand #Alaska call off the hunting & trapping season 4  imperiled Archipelago #Wolves PLS join tweetstorm 7/27: goo.gl/R5FfLq

Tweet this: 💙http://ctt.ec/23g6x

Archipelago #wolves should be protected under #ESA as an #EndangeredSpecies. Help make this happen! Tweetstorm: goo.gl/R5FfLq

Tweet this: 💙http://ctt.ec/otA39

The time to save Alaska’s #wolves is now! Be a voice for Archipelago Wolves. Please join tweetstorm 7/27 #SaveWolves Help out: goo.gl/R5FfLq

Tweet this: 💙http://ctt.ec/nz7ma

Alaska’s Prince of Wales #Wolves are nearing #Extinction. Demand emergency protection! #StandForWolves  goo.gl/R5FfLq

Tweet this: 💙http://ctt.ec/90TJj

Alaska Confirms Massive Decline in Rare Wolves, Still Plans to Hunt Them   5 comments

From takepart by

JUN 20, 2015
Samantha Cowan is TakePart’s associate culture and lifestyle editor.

Another harvest could do irreversible damage to the wolf population.

Alaska Archipelago Wolf (Photo: Facebook)

In 1994 southeast Alaska was home to about 900 Alexander Archipelago wolves. By 2013, there were fewer than 250. Last year that population plummeted 60 percent to 89 wolves. New numbers confirm that the rare breed of wolves could have dropped to as few as 50.

But the diminishing species won’t stop hunters from trapping and killing the wolves, according to the Center for Biological Diversity. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game is moving ahead with their 2015-2016 hunting and trapping season on the Prince of Wales Island, where the majority of the wolves live.

“Another open season of trapping and hunting could push these incredibly imperiled wolves over the edge,” Shaye Wolf, a biologist with the Center for Biological Diversity said in a statement.

A reported 29 wolves were killed during last years hunting season—which accounts for between 33 to 58 percent of the population. Either figure means the species is in jeopardy of being completely wiped out, especially as females were hit particularly hard this season, with only seven to 32 remaining.

So, Why Should You Care? These confirmed numbers could lead to further protections for the breed—which some scientists believe are genetically different from other wolves. The United States Fish and Wildlife Service is working to determine whether the species are considered threatened or endangered under the federal Endangered Species Act, which could put the kibosh on hunting the animals and protect their habitat.

Such protections would impact the timber industry that logs in their range in the Tongass National Forest. The Center for Biological Diversity filed suit in 2009 to save roadless areas of the Tongass.

But the biggest threat to wolves currently is hunters, which makes the forgoing this year’s harvest seem like a no-brainer.

“To maintain a viable population of Alexander Archipelago wolves on this island, Alaska must cancel the season,” said Wolfe. “We won’t get a second chance to preserve these amazing animals.”

Correction June 22, 2015:
An earlier version of this article stated incorrectly that the population of the Alaskan Archipelgo wolf has declined. It is its subspecies living on Prince of Wales Island that has declined.

Petition: Stop Slaughtering Wolves for Fossil Fuel and Logging Greed!

Reckless California Killing Contests Continue Despite Ban on Prizes   2 comments

From:  Animal Legal Defense Fund ~ WINNING THE CASE AGAINT CRUELTY

Posted by Jennifer Molidor, ALDF Staff Writer on February 3, 2015

hunted-coyote-PD-NEBRASKAland-Magazine-article-image-500px

This weekend, February 6-8, the town of Adin, in the rural northeast corner of California, will hold its annual coyote killing spree, the “Big Valley Coyote Drive,” despite the 2014 ban on prizes for killing furbearing animals in contests. Last week, concerned about the high potential for law-breaking at this event, the Animal Legal Defense Fund sent a formal letter to the California Department of Fish & Wildlife, Law Enforcement Division, asking them to send an observer to the Pit River Rod and Gun Club and Adin Supply-sponsored killing contest. Last December, the California Fish and Game Commission banned the distribution of prizes in killing contests.

Historically, every February for the last eight years, contest participants in Adin’s Coyote Drive have competed for large cash prizes and other awards (like expensive artillery) to see who can kill the most native coyotes. These prizes were outlawed in 2014 in California’s Fish and Game Code § 2003:

“it is unlawful to offer any prize or other inducement as a reward for the taking of furbearers in an individual contest, tournament, or derby.”

California taxpayers overwhelmingly support the Commission’s ban on killing contest prizes. A wide majority of hunters also support the ban. In these bloodbaths, animals like foxes, coyotes, and bobcats are cruelly killed for no other reason than to procure prizes for killing. Tens of thousands of signatures have been garnered on a Project Coyote petition to ban wildlife killing contests in California.

Killing contests are reckless wildlife management: those who defend the killing sprees by pointing to an increase in coyote populations refuse to acknowledge science which has conclusively shown that killing animals haphazardly like thisincreases their populations and worsens any “problem” they may create for “livestock.” These contests are creating the problem they pretend to be controlling, and are ineffective at best, savage at worst: glorifying killing for the sake of killing. As ALDF has repeatedly shown, nonlethal predator control works, is more effective, and is more humane.

As a leader in humane laws, California should ban all killing contests—not just the prizes that have traditionally been awarded to hunters. Until that safeguard is in place, California’s Department of Fish & Wildlife must ensure that these reckless killing sprees—like Adin’s this week—are acting in accordance with the ban on prizes that reward this mindless destruction of wildlife.

Please sign ALDF’s pledge to boycott all killing contests.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Excerpts from Vegan Lynx   Leave a comment

From:

Author Archives: CrimsonCorundum

Remove Live Donkeys from Nativity Scene

Click to sign here.


 

Protect Bengal Tiger Habitat

Bengal Tiger Wallpaper Widescreen

Sign the petition here.


 

Stop Kidnapping Baby Elephants for Circuses

Click to sign here.


 

Demand Rental Home Stop Endangering Bears

Sign here.


 

Show Jack Gangwish there are consequences for animal cruelty

Click to sign here.


 

Save Baby Elephants Stolen From Their Families

Sign here.


 

Stop Cruel Puppy Farming in Europe

Click to sign here.


 

Dogs Bludgeoned and Killed in Leather Industry

Sign here.

 

Gadhimai animal slaughter festival over – Compassion in World Farming   Leave a comment

spiritandanimal.wordpress.com

This must never happen again.
Compassion in World Farming
It’s over.
Dear Fredy,
The Gadhimai slaughter festival is over for another 5 years. Many thousands of animals were brutally slaughtered, and our Investigation Unit documented their fate. The animal suffering was immense. This must never happen again.
Alongside our campaign partners Animal Welfare Network Nepal (AWNN) we fought hard to stop the festival. 176,000 of you signed the petition calling for an end to the slaughter and an end to government subsidies for slaughter festivals in Nepal. We also met with the Nepalese Embassy in the UK and worked with animal protection groups in over 20 countries to create international pressure, knowing that the potential risk to tourism was a fear of the Nepalese Government.
Sadly…

View original post 710 more words

CURRENT SITUATION AND IBERIAN WOLF – WOLF SOS Cantabria   2 comments

From:  animalextinction.com

If we are asked of non-governmental associations or groups that defend animals there are surely some that are better known than others. But also think of those that work on more specific areas or covering less known animal species. The effort made ​​by each of the people in these groups, whether large or small, is the same: to devote their free time and all their energy to defend something they believe in. Some have larger resources and others less, they do what they can to make a better world, and therefore all have the same right to be heard, and that defending is just as important whether the organisation is large or small. Given this, animalesextincion.es want to give them a voice, and as a reference we have chosen SOS Lobo Cantabria. It consists of a group of people doing an important work in Spain, defending one of the most endangered species in the Iberian Peninsula, the Iberian wolf. This canine is threatened largely by archaic beliefs and ignorance of their behavior and SOS Wolf Cantabria are collecting signatures and continuous information about changing the dark future that awaited the wolf. There is an article written by José Ramón López that knows the real situation of the Iberian wolf and the work of SOS Lobo. Here you will find detailed and useful information to keep abreast of the species. Link to article.


The Iberian Wolf now has a stable population northwest of the Iberian peninsula, where it is listed as “threatened” while in the Sierra Morena district the Iberian wolf is listed as “extinct”. IUCN has the sub species listed as “vulnerable”. The wolf is a gregarious and a strong social behavior mammal, linked to a group (flock) dominated by an alpha pair and descendants of different generations. The wolves hunt in small groups or individually. It is a territorial animal with a wide range. They can travel between 100 and 1000 km2 depending on the area and food. In the Iberian Peninsula, the optimal habitat for the wolf is one with dense vegetation cover, and low human population density, dense populations of deer and wild boar with domestic cattle to consume carrion mode. Big game does not represent a particularly important resource and livestock is not handled in extensive regime. In terms of biology and characteristics of the species, we will not extend as there is an extensive bibliography and has already been discussed here (Iberian wolf ).

The wolf has coexisted with man from the beginning, being a threat and competition, especially since man began to domesticate and breed animals for consumption. It has always been in direct competition for being a great carnivore. His distant relative, the dog (Canis lupus familiaris), adapted to the submission and dominance of men, today being his favorite animal companion. But the wolf has maintained its freedom, adapting its habits to the growing human presence. It was present in all ecosystems of the Iberian Peninsula, to the nineteenth century date when the population began to diminish. They were then considered a pest and vermin so farmers were organized to assist in eradication efforts. Between 1954 and 1962, 1 470 animals were officially hunted and killed. Cantabria, former province of Santander, was one of the provinces with seal species where 205 wolves were captured in the same period. In the 70s, the wolf was on the verge of disappearance, persecuted and almost extinct. During this period it was estimated that there were between 400 and 500 individuals remaining throughout Spain. In Europe the wolf was eradicated completely in France and Italy. The “lobero” or wolf hunter was respected for his contribution to the community with each kill, something that still happens in rural communities.

The Iberian Wolf, along with the Brown bear (Ursus arctos arctos) is one of the top carnivores at the top of the food chain in the Cantabrian ecosystems and as predators ensure a healthy wildlife. In Cantabria the wolf’s natural prey are roe deer, deer, boars, weasels, rodents, shrews, hares, reptiles and birds. They also eat carrion and even fruit. The wolves arre doing a great job in controlling overpopulation of species that otherwise would have no predator natural selection. Man has conquered their territory, with most of its range intended for cattle and other activities. Cantabria is an autonomous region that historically has specialized in livestock, due to the topography and climate. The scheme has been extended in many of its municipalities, leveraging the creation of pastures in mountain area which until the late twentieth century, was the livelihood for many mountain areas. The wolf when attacking livestock affected the livelihood itself and therefore, he was regarded as harmful and damaging. Any harm to human livelistock was addressed by eradicating the threat, in this case the wolves. This w’sas the origin of the declared war against the wolf. Cantabria is therefore become ​​a mosaic of grassland valleys, hillsides for livestock and some indigenous forests of great importance, especially in the west central region. The valleys correspond to populated areas, meadows and farms, while mountain areas are used as summer pastures. The range of the wolf in the peninsula makes Cantabria wolf populations share with neighboring communities and provinces. Wolves move from one territory to another from Asturias, León, Palencia and Burgos. To a lesser extent with Euskadi since in this region the wolf is practically eradicated. In recent years are being tracked wolves in Las Encartaciones district of borderline Vizcaya Cantabria. In terms of distribution in a 1988 report, it was estimated that the wolf affected 27 of the 102 municipalities of Cantabria occupying area of 2,130 km2. It also included the Commonwealth Campoo-Cabuérniga which is an area of 7,000 ha. of livestock use, jointly and without population. In the study of the report were calculated between 24 and 30 wolves in Cantabria. Another study the same year estimated between 15 and 21 wolves. Due to the territorial nature of the wolf, the range they have and the tight control population suffers, it is unlikely that there are more than 25-30 individuals in the region. Based on previous studies and the range we handle from SOS Lobo we estimate around 30 individuals in the region, failing to meet official and independent data.

PROBLEMS OF THE WOLF

To understand the conflict of wolves in Cantabria one must understand the territorial organization of the mountains of the region. Most of the woods and natural areas are public woodland. For centuries rural populations have exercised the right to use these mountains, currently regulated and controlled by the Forestry Act Cantabria, Law 10/2006 of 28 April . Other mountains correspond to municipal land, of neighborhood councils or less private measure, all subject to the said Act. Although the population density of areas with wolf is low, the density of cattle is still very high . According to the census of 2000, the heads are spread being the most abundant type of beef cattle (349,526), ​​followed by sheep (136,519), goats (30,754) and horses (21,462) mainly. Cattle with greater presence in the region is cattle in different races and specializations. The livestock management continues to maintain a nomadic regime between valleys and mountain passes. In the area of Cantabria, handling, and races, may vary. While the eastern coastal Cantabria and have specialized mainly in milk production with the introduction of Friesian cattle, western specializes in breeding for there is also a strong presence of sheep in Campo and some valleys and an increase in almost all the region of equines in extensive regime. As cattle in the east, livestock is controlled to a greater extent, having major housing. However, in the western area of specialization meat, livestock is long periods of time in the bush released without supervision or extensive regime. This did not occur just over 50 years ago. In those years there were one or several pastors who stayed in huts and cottages enabled to guard animals in the pastures where cattle graze during the summer months. Today there have been changes in grazing management, as it exploits the forest tracks and ATVs to upload and monitor livestock. In very few areas of the region there is anyone who cares. In the Liébana, there is still some shepherd that keeps the tradition of grazing. On the other hand, livestock, more often the main economic activity to complement the family economy. The greatest damage produced in smaller livestock grazing may be in most cases public forest or on private farms. The importance of livestock in the region and the large area of public forest make Cantabria have a counseling especially for Livestock and tertiary activities (Ministry of Livestock, Fisheries and Rural Development). The Directorate General of Forestry, dependent thereon, is responsible for managing public forests and ensure the conservation of nature, among many other functions. Currently this Ministry is responsible for managing natural areas and wildlife, thereby causing significant conflicts of interest between conservation, hunting management and livestock. That is, the conservation of wildlife is managed as in the case of the Iberian wolf, but the ranching and hunting is also managed. Due to pressure from municipalities with wolf and inheritance eradication as a management the Ministry of Livestock, Fisheries and Rural Development has always controlled the number of wolves, based on criteria such as the livestock kills and action lawsuits from farmers through their councils’

SOS LOBO Cantabria

The wolf and its management has always been a controversial issue, especially in a region like Cantabria. In the spring of 2013, as in previous years by that time, a series of major wolf raids were performed by National Park Picos de Europa (Municipalities Cantabria), in the Saja Besaya Natural Park and spaces of Red Natura 2000. In some collaboration with hunters and forestry crews, using arts as fireworks and combing the woods. He also performed raids in the breeding period of the wolves and many other species knowing the significant environmental impact that can be generated. In the vacuum of these raids, SOS Lobo Cantabria was founded. Then there is the ignorance of most of the population of the region (who is not related to rural, livestock or hunting) and Spain. We are a group of citizens who promote wolf conservation and the environment. We denounce the situation of the wolf in Spain and in Cantabria and promote that the administration works for the conservation and sustainable management of these beautiful creatures.

The first and foremost action that SOS Lobo disclosed is the petition on the platform change.org: To discontinue pursue and kill the Iberian wolf in Cantabria. SOS Lobo Cantabria is formed by people committed to the conservation of nature and the environment. Far from radical positions, we aim to raise awareness and encourage the competent authorities to rectify the way we manage nature and specifically to this species which has been so punished and yet so valued outside the region. The group starts to work to publicize the problem there is with the wolf, the collection of signatures grows and the press echoes. We denounce and we present serious situations like the death of nine wolves in the same group in two hunts of wild boar in the Liébana. Unfortunately, this practice in hunting and ferrous population controls have been doing for years, while many people think happily that Wolves are protected, the reality is that they are indeed hunted and far too often. After a year of campaigning and collecting over 84,000 signatures, we are making the same strides we pronounced in June 2013. The Ministry of Livestock, Fisheries and Rural Development, Government of Cantabria has announced that it would conduct a census of the wolf in the region and that was to prohibit the quota of a wolf in each whipped boar hunting season. View News

Despite the shocking holder ‘Cantabria prohibit hunting lobos’ and after examining the content of the proposed new rules, boar-hunters can still kill wolves for an extra smaller fee. On the other hand it was announced that the Ministry has requested a census of the wolf in the region, which we include in the letter accompanying our request. We do not know exactly how many wolves are in the region independently and reliably. What looked like a twist of wolf management in Cantabria seems to have been a publicity stunt if a real interest in changing anything.

CURRENT SITUATION

According to the administration livestock attacks can often be contributed to wild dogs. Although farmers blame the wolf in most of the complaints, it is the Ministry that, after opening the file, make appropriate inquiries and if the damage was caused by this animal, the owners receive compensation due. Instead farmers complain that aid is arriving late and procedures are lengthy. Furthermore there have already been detected many cases of fraud as recently reported in Asturias. Increased wild dogs and anger against the wolf in rural environments perceives a density much higher than the actual wolves, reaching as many as 30 wolves in a forest administration. It is overestimated the number of wolves occupying areas without actual knowledge of number. If you consider the thousands of head of cattle in the mountains of Cantabria go unchecked, you could that the number of attacks is not as important. On the other hand in case of an actual attack and upon certification by the competent technicians owners are indeed compensated. One can give the most varied circumstances, such as a carcass eaten by the wolf as carrion to intend to collect compensation. One of the arguments of the farmers concerned is the slow arrival of aid and amount. Of course we think it is essential that such compensation is fair and swift, and we think it should punish whoever seeks to benefit from these measures deceiving the administration that runs it. The ancestral battle with the wolf in rural areas being one of oral tradition has transmitted ideas like the wolf is an animal murderer who kills for pleasure or that it should be eradicated. The wolf or any wild animal take no pleasure in hunting, driven only by instinct and need. If it is known that the wolf kills and save carrion to feed later. The wolf behavior is altered by having its natural foodsource unsuited to escape his attacks. However, in areas where there are many cattle, but lots of wildlife such as deer, roe deer and other natural prey of wolf attacks are less frequent. Another commonly argument used by advocates of extinction is that the wolf can ruin families of farmers or shepherds. This is an argument that was true many years ago, but today very few people live only ranching. This argument today is meaningless because of the compensation, aid for rural development and livestock, in many cases, is a complement to income. Many of the areas of distribution of wolf form part of the Natura 2000 network. The governments receive and manage EU funds, including funds for livestock activities. In return, the management of these natural areas must be compatible with the conservation of species and habitats covered by EU rules. Furthermore, in order to maintain and set population in rural and mountain areas, European institutions help to promote traditional uses. The Iberian wolf is a jewel of our wildlife and it is expected that administrations ensure preservation of our heritage.

THREATS

Among the threats that the species in Cantabria highlight:

Alteration of habitat – Forest fires are an example. In Cantabria there is very frequent use of illegal burning in the mountains. Some infrastructure and specific actions also affect the foraging area and hunting.

Poaching – We do not have statistics, but wolf poachers in the region use the head as a trophy. Similarly, there is poaching on their natural prey.

Overhunting – Regulated hunting raids promoted by the administration cause heavy casualties on wolf populations. Packs are segmented, motherless babies, leaderless groups. Situations that can greatly affect the behavior of the species and favor hybridization.

Hybridization – The domestic dog and his kind, whether recognized as cases of hybridization. The hunting of the species without control is favoring that hybridization occurs. They kill wolves during the breeding leaving cubs and yearlings without reference group nor its kind, which is easier to establish connection with feral dogs.

Lazos – It was a very common practice of poaching used historically by alimañeros and whose culture is still present in the region.

Use of poisons – The great blackmail of those in favor of extinguishing species like the wolf. They know the dangers of this method and its effects on almost all wildlife populations.

AUTHOR José Ramón López Lobo SOS Cantabria .

Anyone wishing to add their name to their petition can do so at:

https://www.change.org/p/que-se-deje-de-perseguir-y-matar-al-lobo-ib%C3%A9rico-en-cantabria

 

Behind the Fur Coat: The Story of Chinchillas in 20 Photos   Leave a comment

From:  People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals.

To celebrate the excellent news that Sweden’s last chinchilla fur farm has just been closed down, we decided to take a closer look at these sweet animals – and how they suffer at the hands of the global fur trade.

  1. Swedish animal rights group Djurrättsalliansen rescued the 243 surviving chinchillas from the farm in Enköping, Sweden, which was closed down following alleged breaches of animal welfare laws.
    Rescue shot
  2. The group is now working with the police to press charges against the owner of the fur farm.
    Chinchilla in cage (blurry)
  3. The chinchillas are being transferred to new homes. Some needed veterinary treatment for sores from being forced to wear painfully tight collars around their necks.
    Highlighted sore neck copy
  4. Progress! In 2000, there were 25 chinchilla farms in Sweden – now, there are none, thanks to tireless campaigning by Djurrättsalliansen and other groups.
    Baby in hand
  5. But around 80,000 chinchillas are still being farmed for fur across Europe – and many more globally.
    Single cage
  6. Chinchillas originate from the Andes in South America, where their thick fur allows them to survive cold mountain temperatures.
    CC Chinchilla wild
    DSC05341” by Chris Smith Ronnie Shumate / CC BY 2.0
  7. Sadly, that same fur has led to millions of them being killed so that hard-hearted humans can turn their skins into coats, scarves and throws.
    pcases_422.11_015
  8. In the wild, chinchillas are now critically endangered as a result of humans hunting and trapping them for their fur.
    Chinchilla on rock
    Chinchilla” by qiv / CC BY-SA 2.0
  9. Chinchillas are quiet and shy, with a natural lifespan of 10 to 20 years.
    stock chinchilla
  10. On fur farms, they’re typically killed when they’re just 8 months old – often, in horrible ways.
    pcases_422.11_011
  11. One PETA US investigation documented a farmer breaking chinchillas’ necks with his hands as they squealed in terror. In Europe, they’re usually electrocuted before being skinned.
    pcases_422.11_007
  12. More than 200 chinchillas may be killed to create just one fur coat.
    Chinchilla fur coat.
  13. Chinchillas are highly social, and in the wild, they live in colonies with more than 100 other individuals.
    2 together
  14. On fur farms, they’re likely to be kept in tiny individual cages, piled on top of one another, where they are never able to interact with other members of their species.
    Cages piled
  15. Their natural behaviour includes taking dust baths, exploring rocks and crevices, playing and jumping up to 6 feet.
    Chinchilla in house
  16. In barren fur-farm cages, chinchillas can do none of these things.
    pcases_422.11_001
  17. With their huge dark eyes and kooky big ears, chinchillas are ADORABLE.
    CC Chinchilla RSPCA
    Living in the RSPCA” by Daniel Hall / CC BY-SA 2.0
  18. They’re also notable for being kind to one another. For example, if a chinchilla mum has problems producing milk to feed her babies, another female will often step in to assist, while male chinchillas will often help out with babysitting.
    Wildpark_Klosterwald_Chinchilla_01
    Wildpark Klosterwald Chinchilla 01” by  cherubino / CC BY-SA 3.0
  19. One day, hopefully, humans will learn to be kind to chinchillas, too, and stop slaughtering them in order to make gruesome pieces of clothing.
    CUTE
  20. Be part of the solution by pledging never to wear fur and speaking out against retailers that still sell it.
    Take Action Now
    Sad one

Images 1-5, 13-15, 19-20: Djurrättsalliansen

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