Archive for November 2015

Will reintroduced lynx hunt Britain’s sheep?   3 comments

October 29, 2015 Source

Farmers are concerned that the reintroduced predator will kill livestock, but research from other countries shows these fears are unfounded

 

 

Wolves and the Endangered Species Act   Leave a comment

PunditSource

The Endangered Species Act was written into law in 1973. Since then it has successfully protected 99% of the species that fall into the “endangered” and “threatened” categories of the law. For this article in particular we will be focusing on the different species of wolves that are protected by this law.

Prior to the wolf being added to the Endangered Species list they were hunted to near extinction in North America and Mexico. Currently in America there are around 9,000 wolves populating the country, thanks in great part to the protections afforded them against hunters and poachers. However there is a current push on the State and National levels to reverse or otherwise dismantle the law protecting not only wolves but 2,179 other species of animals that face possible extinction within North America due to human activity.

Over the past couple of years some states such as Idaho, Montana…

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Posted 24 November, 2015 by Wolf is my Soul in News/Nyheter

26 scientists are urging the western Great Lakes population of gray wolves be removed from protections of the Endangered Species Act   Leave a comment

Posted 24 November, 2015 by Wolf is my Soul in News/Nyheter

First winter snow at International Wolf Center   Leave a comment

Dear Kitty. Some blog

This video from Minnesota in the USA says about itself:

International Wolf Center – First Snow of Winter – 20 November 2015

The International Wolf Center advances the survival of wolf populations by teaching about wolves, their relationship to wildlands and the human role in their future.

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Posted 24 November, 2015 by Wolf is my Soul in News/Nyheter

Conflicts between wolves, hunting dogs in Michigan decline in 2015   Leave a comment

The Outdoor Journal

gray_wolf_canis_lupus Hollingsworth John and Karen, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Gray wolves in Michigan attacked fewer hunting dogs in 2015. Photo: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Wikimedia Commons.

By Howard Meyerson

Grand Rapids, Mich. – Michigan’s 2015 bear hunting season ended in October with fewer incidents than last year of hunting dogs being attacked by wolves. Only three attacks were reported to the state, down from 17 in the 2014 season, state wildlife officials said.

“It’s tough to speculate about why,” said Kevin Swanson, wolf and bear specialist for the Michigan DNR. “Livestock depredation reports are down too. We had 23 of those last year and only 11 so far this year. It’s possible that wolf numbers have declined, but we don’t know that and plan to do a wolf survey this winter.”

Michigan’s wolf population was last tallied in 2014. The DNR survey showed a minimum of 636 wolves in the Upper Peninsula. There were approximately 125 wolf packs…

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Posted 24 November, 2015 by Wolf is my Soul in News/Nyheter

Commentary by Wildlife Defence League: Government Stoops to New Low in BC Wolf Cull   2 comments

Wolves of Douglas County News

SourceWildlife Defence League

November 19, 2015Government Stoops to New Low in BC Wolf Cull

Commentary by Wildlife Defence League

Shocking new information has revealed that Liberal government contractors intend to follow wolves to their dens to slaughter entire packs, including pups. ‘Judas’ wolves, as they have come to be known, will be collared and traced to the pack’s location, making it that much easier to destroy them throughout the South Peace and South Selkirk.
Last year, the Liberal government ordered the killing of 84 wolves in the South Selkirk and South Peace Region to allow for the recovery of dwindling caribou herds. Despite the Liberal’s claim that wolves were to blame for loss of caribou, independent science points towards industrial expansion as the true reason for the decline. Recently, a Freedom of Information Request obtained by the Wilderness Committee outlines the timber industries attempt to avoid putting restrictions on…

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Posted 24 November, 2015 by Wolf is my Soul in News/Nyheter

Wolves may be recovered enough to delist but are individual states prepared to protect them?    Leave a comment

Wolves of Douglas County News

Wild wolf howling in the Canadian Rockies Copyright : John E Marriott
Point counter point:

The newest debate on the fate of America’s wolves comes in the form of a letter…”The 18 November (2015) letter, sent to Interior Secretary Sally Jewell and Dan Ashe, director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), is intended to support the federal government’s position that wolves in Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Michigan are fully recovered and that states should now manage the species.”Science Insider

The letter from 26 scientists states that wolves have recovered enough in the Great Lakes region and do not need protection under the Endangered Species Act.

Recovery of wolves has made great strides over the last 4 decades in the region with a population of over 3,700 wolves.

That is until 2011 when wolves were officially delisted in the Great Lakes and states like Wisconsin rushed to enact emergncy…

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Posted 24 November, 2015 by Wolf is my Soul in News/Nyheter

What’s Missing In This Picture?   2 comments

I am for re-introducing the wolf as a predator in Scotland and the rest of Great Britain as well. I am convinced there has to be a common middle ground where both pro and anti wolf groups can meet. Reblogged at Wolf Is My Soul

The Top Of The Tree

Quaint, rural Scotland. But something's missing... Quaint, rural Scotland. But something’s missing. Want to know why?

I grew up cutting about in the woods and along the shoreline of the west coast of Scotland. It was magical – so easy to escape to wonder & fantasy of another world, away from the concrete & structure of ‘real life’. In those woods I would encounter mysterious beasties & monsters, and back in Nottinghamshire I would be regaled with tales of Robin Hood & Sherwood Forest. Now, if I could go anywhere in the world, I would go to Britain, but back when it was all wild forest & woodland.

Now I’m an Ecologist I’ve learned that it’s not just fantastical romanticism, but there are actually many practical reasons for wanting to return to a wilder Britain. And I’m not the only one who feels like this. The concept of ‘re-wilding‘ parts of Britain –…

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Posted 24 November, 2015 by Wolf is my Soul in News/Nyheter

Wolf Den…   Leave a comment

Love your wolf art!

Abstract Art by Sharon Cummings

Image

The lone Wolf.  Wolves are fascinating creatures.  Hollywood has portrayed them as aggressive malicious animals that attack humans for no reason, when in fact they are quite shy. They will attack if threatened of course as anyone would, but they prefer to live peacefully in their territory. These beautiful creatures form family units and live and hunt as such.  Each pack has an Alpha male and an Alpha female which protects and cares for the rest of their group which can be from 4 – 7 wolves.  Everyone shares in the responsibility of pup rearing.  Mating happens once a year and only the Alpha female gets this privilege.  Wolves are quite large and can get to 200 pounds.  They use their fur and howl to communicate with others.  Sadly their population is declining mainly due to habitat loss.  In my art I try to convey the beauty and majesty of…

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Posted 24 November, 2015 by Wolf is my Soul in News/Nyheter

Winter is coming: A time when wolf packs battle for the Yellowstone throne   1 comment

Source  Eartharchives.org

November 16, 2015

Territorial species, like gray wolves living in Yellowstone National Park, will often fight if they encounter a neighboring group. Observational research over the course of 20 years has allowed scientists in Yellowstone to examine the roles of each individual in a wolf pack during these fights over territory and resources. They have discovered that old wolves are the most important in pack versus pack fights as the experience and leadership provided by an old wolf often allows a pack to win even if they are outnumbered.

River Valley Pack, 

“All the wolves trotted to the stranger and practically surrounded it, and for a few moments I thought that they would be friendly toward it for there was just the suggestion of tail wagging by some of them. But something tipped the scales the other way for the wolves began to bite at the stranger. It rolled over on its back, begging quarter. The attack continued, however, so it scrambled to its feet and with difficulty emerged from the snapping wolves. Twice it was knocked over as it ran down the slope with five wolves in hot pursuit. They chased after it about 200 yards to the river bar, and the mantled male crossed the bar after it. The two ran out of my sight under the ridge from which I was watching.”

– Murie, Adolph. 1944. The Wolves of Mount McKinley. University of Washington Press.

It was 1940 and Adolph Murie was hired to record data on wolves and Dall sheep in Denali National Park (then called Mount McKinley). Murie followed one pack closely for several years, watching them raise pups, hunt prey, and even chase and attack intruding wolves. His field notes may have been the first time in history these territorial, aggressive accounts were written down. I like to imagine this consummate observer and naturalist would be happy to hear the work he began nearly 80 years ago has continued with the return of the wolf to Yellowstone National Park.

 

Since the reintroduction of gray wolves to Yellowstone 20 years ago scientists have been gathering data on survival and reproduction, mortality and hunting. But one thing biologists didn’t really expect when wolves were brought back to Yellowstone following a 70-year absence was their consistent visibility. Wide open valleys with abundant elk and plowed roads, combined with a decent scope or pair of binoculars, now provides visitors and scientists views of wolf behavior rarely seen elsewhere.

Biologists have long known wolves are territorial and have noted the difference between the amiable way wolves treat pack mates, usually their close family members, and the aggression they show neighboring, rival packs. When a wolf was found dead researchers pieced together clues from tracks, often concluding that a pack-vs-pack fight had occurred. In Yellowstone those interactions have been observed and recorded for two decades and play a decidedly influential role in the lives of gray wolves, accounting for two-thirds of natural mortality.

Besides the effects these territorial fights have on individual survival, they likely have long-term effects on reproduction, pack persistence, and the redistribution of resources based on which packs are able to consistently defeat their opponents. But what allows one pack to win over a rival? Is it just a numbers game with larger packs always winning out over smaller ones? Do resident packs enjoy a home field advantage? Or is there some compositional factor? Are packs with more of a certain type of wolf, say a large male wolf in his prime, more likely to win? Observational research, like Murie’s, was the only way to find out.

It was 10 a.m. but the mid-morning sun was just barely cresting the eastern ridge. I’d been alternately huddling for warmth in my layers of down and stomping around the small dirt trailhead trying to keep feeling in my toes for over two hours. Watching as the western slopes lit and warmed, I beheld nature’s visual timepiece, anticipating the blanket of sunlight edging temperatures into positive degrees.

I was tracking the Slough Creek wolf pack by listening for pings on the radio receiver, indicating one of the collared wolves was nearby. Finally I saw them travelling up out of the Yellowstone River corridor, their thick winter coats shedding river ice, keeping them a lot warmer than me and definitely not worrying themselves over the speed of the sunrise that morning.

The seven figures followed in each other’s footsteps, noses to the ground. They gathered around one area, and judging by their quickly rising tails and hackles, it was the fresh scent of rival wolves. The alpha male took off running to the north, the five pack females and a yearling male following quickly. Intrigued by the wolves’ behavior, I tuned the receiver to test the signals for other packs. Sure enough, loud beeps from a Druid Peak pack wolf rang out—they must be close by, too. I looked back in the scope and watched the Slough Creek pack running hard now, the dark black alpha male in the lead. Scanning ahead of them about 400 meters I saw five members of the Druid Peak pack. They glanced at each other and began their own charge, tails like flags, straight at their opponents.

The distance closed rapidly and all of a sudden it was chaos. The Slough alpha male slammed his body into a Druid wolf but when another grabbed his neck and shook violently he broke loose and ran out of the fray. The Slough females followed the male’s wake but finding themselves in the midsts of four huge male Druid wolves, tucked tails and ran. Two of the Sloughs turned around and hopped briefly onto their hind legs, trying to figure out who was a pack mate and who was not. The Druid wolves stayed in a solitary unit, chasing and spreading out the Slough wolves for several minutes, keeping them from joining together. As the commotion died down, the Slough wolves started to bark-howl from all angles. They were lost and separated, not sure where to go for fear of running into the Druids again. Eventually the tension dissipated and the Druids relaxed. The Sloughs wandered in several small groups, separated by miles of mountainside.

Even though the Sloughs outnumbered the Druids, they had lost; completely displaced from the fight location—firmly in Slough Creek pack territory. And as it turned out, this encounter would be the prime example of what characteristics are important to a pack during successful inter-pack interactions.

The first important factor, the only one in the Slough’s favor, was pack size. Having one more wolf than an opponent increases a pack’s odds of winning by 140%. Numerical assessment studies have found this same pattern in many social species from chimpanzees to African lions to mongooses. But for wolves, pack composition is also important. A pack with one more adult male enjoys a 65% increase in win odds. Adult male wolves are 20% larger and more muscular than females; they are built for fighting and protecting territory and resources. The Druids had the advantage here with two adult males more than the Sloughs (4 to 2). A home-field advantage doesn’t exist for wolves. Even intruders can compete with residents if they have the numbers or those valuable individuals present.

But the most influential factor was the presence of old wolves (>6 years old). A pack with one old wolf more than an opponent had 150% greater odds of winning—making it more important than pack size. As the Druids exemplified (they had one more old adult than the Sloughs), they won despite being outnumbered. Old adults are nowhere near the fastest or the strongest but what they do have is experience. They’ve encountered competitors many times. They’ve seen pack mates killed, and likely participated in killing a rival themselves. They may avoid a conflict they figure they can’t win—upping their success percentage. Leadership and experience make old wolves the most valuable individuals in the pack during aggressive encounters.

These pack vs pack battles have gone on for thousands of years, contributing to the evolution of territoriality, aggression, and sociality in gray wolves. There have surely been occasional human witnesses to these episodes of truly wild nature: Homo sapiens during the Pleistocene, Lewis and Clark on the Corps of Discovery, and, of course, biologist Adolph Murie in 1940s Alaska. And now, in Yellowstone, we can all observe this instinctive yet advanced behavior exhibited by a complex, social species—a  species with intelligence and a division of labor amongst group members, the goal to protect themselves, their resources, and each other.

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