Archive for the ‘Poachers’ Tag

Mountville man admits poaching three deer; heading to Central Park to shoot more   Leave a comment

From:  Lancaster Online

Dec. 30, 2014 by P.J. Reilly

Walt Earl Stickley and Allen Glick already had three dead deer in the back of their pickup truck when they rolled into Lancaster County Central Park at midnight Nov. 1.

Pennsylvania Game Commission Wildlife Conservation Officer Dennis Warfel said the men went to the park to shoot more.

Unfortunately for them, however, Warfel happened to be sitting in the park on night patrol.

He stopped the two before they could fire a shot.

“The message we want to get out there is, we are out there watching,” Warfel said.

PA Game Commission logo

 

Shackled and sitting in a wheelchair, Stickley, 50, of the 3800 block of Columbia Avenue, Mountville, on Tuesday appeared in District Judge William Benner Jr.’s office to plead guilty to several lesser charges and to waive his preliminary hearing on more serious offenses in connection with the Nov. 1 incident.

Part of Stickley’s left foot is amputated, which is why he was in a wheelchair.

Glick, 49, no address given, has not responded to official requests to appear in court to answer for his alleged role.

According to court documents, Warfel was sitting in his vehicle in central park at 11:54 p.m. on Nov. 1 when he spotted a red beam of light sweep across a field.

Shining a spotlight on deer is a common activity across Pennsylvania, but it is illegal after 11 p.m.

The light was being shined out the window of a truck traveling on Golf Road.

Warfel stopped the truck, and immediately noticed blood on the tailgate.

He then saw three deer carcasses in the bed of the truck.

Warfel asked the men if there was a firearm in the truck.

When they said there was, Warfel ordered them to get out one at a time, and he handcuffed them at the rear of the truck.

He then recovered a scoped, .22-caliber rifle, with three rounds in the magazine and one round on the floor.

The affidavit said Stickley and Glick admitted using the spotlight and killing the deer earlier that night at White Clay Creek Preserve in southern Chester County.

Stickley shot the deer, while Glick held the light.

They said they went to Lancaster County Central Park to try to shoot another one, according to the affidavit.

Warfel also discovered that the license plate on Stickley’s truck was stolen, and Stickley was driving with a suspended license.

Stickley and Glick both were charged by the Game Commission with three counts of unlawfully killing big game out of season, illegal spotlighting, unlawful use of a spotlight while hunting and illegal possession of a firearm in a vehicle while spotlighting.

Additionally, Stickley was charged by West Lampeter Township police with receiving stolen property and driving with a suspended license.

Stickley pleaded guilty Tuesday to all of the Game Commission charges, except for one count of unlawfully killing big game out of season.

He was charged an $800 replacement fee for each of the three deer killed, for a total of $2,400.

Because Stickley shot multiple deer, one count of unlawfully killing big game out of season was upgraded to a first-degree misdemeanor.

Stickley will have to appear in Lancaster County Court of Common Pleas to answer that charge and both of  the township’s charges.

After Tuesday’s hearing, he was taken back to Lancaster County Prison.

Warfel said he will try to permanently confiscate the .22-caliber rifle he removed from Stickley’s truck Nov. 1, since that was the second time he confiscated the firearm.

Warfel cited Stickley in 2009 for spotlighting with that same loaded rifle in his vehicle in the Holtwood area.

“The people of Pennsylvania value wildlife, such as deer,” Warfel said. “We’re not just going to stand by while they are taken illegally.”

Photo courtesy of the Pennsylvania Game CommissionThe Pennsylvania Game Commission today delayed banning rifles for deer hunting in the Lehigh Valley.

 

 

 

Will the Rhino survive?   3 comments

From:  Frank Versteegh

Dec. 23, 2014

Will the Rhino surive?

A slain black rhino mom and her orphan calf.

 

Will the Rhino survive us?

This weekend I spent a few days in the lowfeld near Phalaborwa.

As many other National parks in South Africa, the Kruger is also suffering from poaching.
Rhino poaching in specific.
When I entered the gate the rangers ask you two questions. Do you have alcohol? Do you have guns? They check the car booth but any criminal will be able to smuggle in fire arms. This way of checking for guns is definitely not effective.

I did not see a Rhino. During the 400 km’s through the Kruger National park I did not see one!
Only in the Kruger park in 2013 300 Rhinos have been shot for their horn.

IMG_6674 - Version 2

24/7 rangers guards near the Rhino’s Ntombi and Tabo in Thula Thula.

 

Poached.
Organized criminals use all means to kill this animal.  Often with help (information) from locals. And as some people say, the horns sometimes leave the country in diplomatic mail. Poaching Rhino’s is big business. The horn is more valuable per ounce than gold. China and Vietnam are the biggest markets for Rhino horn as they believe the horn is an afrodisiac.

Rangers do anything to protect these animals but it is WAR. A full scale war between organised criminals with helicopters and rangers who try to defend the Rhino with their lives.

In 2014 already 40 people have been killed in the war against poaching.

Rhino Relocation

Sedated rhino airlifted.

How to protect?

Some private game parks have 24/7 guards following the Rhino in order to try to prevent these creatures from going extinct.

Others inject the horn with poison in order to make it useless for the consumers in the far-east.

Some nature conservationists believe in re-location of the Rhino to remote areas where they are safe. Others think concentrating Rhinos is helping the poachers.

In some game reserves the Rhino horn is injected with a chip, so that the poached horn can be traced by satellites.

Rhino poster 2 _ draw horn

Save our Rhino campaign poster.

 

A marketing campaign in China and Vietnam is also considered by some organizations. However , huge budgets are needed for campaigns like that.
At the turn of the 19th century there were more than 1.000.000 (million) Rhino’s.
In 2007 1 Rhino was poached every month.
As you can see at the attached pics the numbers of poached Rhino went up year by year.
In 2013 89 (Eighty nine) Rhino’s were poached each month.
When poaching continues in this rate, in my life time, we will not be able to see this creature anymore.

We, humans kill one of the last dinosaurs. Is there any hope for the Rhino?

http://www.stoprhinopoaching.com/

Poaching

Poaching copy

Poachers arrests

Ten good reasons to save rhinos

  1. Rhinos are critically endangered
    At the turn of the 19th century, there were approximately one million rhinos. In 1970, there were around 70,000. Today, there are only around 28,000 rhinos surviving in the wild.Three of the five species of rhino are “Critically Endangered” as defined by theIUCN (World Conservation Union). A taxon is classified as critically endangered when the best available evidence indicates that it meets any of a range of pre-determined criteria. It is therefore considered to be facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild. The Southern subspecies of the white rhino is classified by theIUCN in the lesser category of being “Near Threatened”; and the Greater one-horned rhino is classified as “Vulnerable”; even this is considered to be facing a high risk of extinction in the wild.In 2014, some of us are lucky enough to be able to travel to Africa and Asia to see them in the wild. In 2024, when our children have grown up, will they still be able to see wild rhinos?
  2. Rhinos have been around for 40 million years
    Rhinos have been an important part of a wide range of ecosystems for millions of years; we must not let them join the dodo in extinction.
  3. Humans have caused the drastic decline in numbers
    Poachers kill rhinos for the price they can get for the horns (used for traditional Chinese medicine, for high-status gifts in Vietnam and for quack cures invented by criminal syndicates to drive up demand); land encroachment, illegal logging and pollution are destroying their habitat; and political conflicts adversely affect conservation programmes.
  4. Rhinos are an umbrella species
    When protecting and managing a rhino population, rangers and scientists take in account all the other species interacting with rhinos and those sharing the same habitat. When rhinos are protected, many other species are too; not only mammals but also birds, reptiles, fish and insects as well as plants.
  5. Rhinos are charismatic mega-herbivores!
    By focusing on a well-known animal such as a rhino (or, to use the jargon, a charismatic mega-herbivore), we can raise more money and consequently support more conservation programmes benefiting animal and plant species sharing their habitat.
  6. Rhinos attract visitors and tourists
    Rhinos are the second-biggest living land mammals after the elephants. Together with lion, giraffe, chimpanzee and polar bear, the rhino is one of the most popular species with zoo visitors. In the wild, rhinos attract tourists who bring money to national parks and local communities. They are one of the “Big Five”, along with lion, leopard, elephant and buffalo.
  7. In situ conservation programmes need our help
    Protecting and managing a rhino population is a real challenge that costs energy and money. Rhino-range countries need our financial support, and benefit from shared expertise and exchange of ideas.
  8. Money funds effective conservation programmes that save rhinos
    We know that conservation efforts save species. The Southern white rhino would not exist today if it were not for the work of a few determined people, who brought together the 200 or so individuals surviving, for a managed breeding and re-introduction programme. Today, there are some 20,405 (as at 31 Dec. 2012) Southern white rhinos.With more money, we can support more programmes, and not just save rhino populations, but increase numbers and develop populations. The Northern white rhino subspecies may just have become extinct, but it is not too late to save the rest.
  9. Many people don’t know that rhinos are critically endangered
    Not just that, but how many people know that rhinos also live in Asia? Or that two species have just one horn? Or that the horn is not used as an aphrodisiac? We have even heard some people say that they are carnivores!
    If people do not know about these amazing animals and the problems they are facing, how can we expect them to want to do something to help save rhinos?
  10. We all have an opportunity to get involved!
    You can help us raise awareness of the plight of the rhino! The more we do all together, the more people will learn about rhinos and the more field projects we will be able to support. There are lots of fundraising ideas scattered in the ‘Support us’ section, as well as ways to donate directly to Save the Rhino.

http://www.stoprhinopoaching.com/

IMG_6696 - Version 2

Ntombi and Tabo, two orphins in Thula Thula, now 5 years old.

 

2007

 

 

CPW seeks help with Moffat County poaching incidents   Leave a comment

From:  Craig Daily Press

Colorado Parks & Wildlife/For the Daily Press

Colorado Parks and Wildlife is investigating three additional incidents of illegally killed bull elk in high-quality hunting units in Moffat County, adding to three high-quality bulls illegally killed in Game Management Unit 10 in early November, near the town of Dinosaur.

Two bulls were found along Highway 318 late last week, northwest of Maybell. Both were estimated to have been killed before Thanksgiving and were entirely field-dressed. The other was found several miles away on Highway 10N, south of Irish Canyon.

Thought to have been killed at the end of the Fourth Rifle season, only the front shoulders and backstraps were removed from that bull.

With the known total of illegally taken elk in this area now at six this year, CPW officials are asking the public for help, reminding of a unique, CPW reward program available to anyone that can provide information about the person or persons responsible for killing the high-quality bulls.

The incentive program is known as Turn In Poachers, or TIP.

“Through TIP, if a hunter provides information about poaching incidents involving big game they may be eligible to receive a quality bull elk license in the unit where the tip was turned in if it results in a conviction for the take of an illegal six-point bull elk or willful destruction,”
said District Wildlife Manager Mike Swaro, of Craig.

Officials say that instead of a license a person may instead opt for a preference point for any big game species of their choice.

Swaro said that in the latest incident, the elk were taken in Game Management Units 2 and 201, known for producing some of the largest bulls in the state. It may take a hunter up to 20 years to gather enough preference points to hunt in these units, he said.

“Someone knows who did this, and we ask that they do the right thing and come forward,” added Swaro. “Along with the evidence we were able to gather at the scenes and additional information from the public, we should be able to find who did this in due time.”

To be eligible for points or a license through the TIP program, any person providing information must be willing to testify in court, in contrast to Operation Game Thief, a tip hotline that affords anonymity to any person providing information about a wildlife crime.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife officials remind the public that poaching is a serious offense that can lead to felony charges, significant fines, a prison sentence and the permanent loss of hunting and fishing privileges in Colorado and 43 other Interstate Wildlife Violator Compact states.

“If you saw something or heard something, let us know right away,” Swaro said. “Even if it does not seem like a significant detail, it may be the information we need to find the people responsible. Poachers commit crimes that affect everyone and the public’s help is critical to bring them to justice.”

To provide information about these incidents, call Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s Meeker office at 970-878-6090 or DWM Swaro at 970-942-8275. To remain anonymous, call Operation Game Thief at 877-265-6648.

Rewards are available if the information leads to a citation. Please specify which type of reward you are interested in, OGT or TIP.

For more information about Turn In Poachers, go towww.cpw.state.co.us/aboutus/Pages/TurnInPoachers.aspx. For more information about Operation Game Thief, go to www.cpw.state.co.us/aboutus/Pages/OGT.aspx.

Increased giraffe poaching in Arusha region   7 comments

From:  WANTED in AFRICA

Maasai Giraffe, Lake Manyara, Tanzania

Maasai Giraffe, Lake Manyara, Tanzania (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Giraffe killing highlighted in the Manyara lake district

Poachers are turning their attention to giraffes in the Manyara lake region, south-west of Arusha, according to reports in local media.

Tanzania‘s national symbol, the giraffe, is a protected species but is coming under increasing attack from poachers keen to take advantage of the booming illicit trade in giraffe meat.

The killing of the animals is also fuelled by the mistaken belief that the consumption of giraffe brains and bone marrow is an effective cure for HIV/AIDS.

Giraffe meat is allegedly transported around Tanzania as well as being smuggled to restaurants in neighbouring countries where it can command a high price. The animals’ skin and hair is also used to make illegal bracelets, necklaces and fly swatters.

Some local wildlife rangers acknowledge the killing of giraffes in the Manyara area but claim that poachers do not target giraffes specifically – often killing gazelle, antelope and zebra as well.

Environmentalists say that giraffe poaching has become a problem across Africa, as the sedentary animals are easy prey for their attackers, often staring at a poacher before running away. Giraffes can also be killed with one shot and are easily trapped using leg and neck snares.

 

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